Calling! Salon (Edited transcript)

Posted By on November 17, 2014

Bookworm Hienrichs: I think we’ll get started now. And please excuse me if I fall silent – I may freeze up while talking.

Welcome to this month’s Aether Salon! Today, Lord Mayor Perryn Peterson of Mieville has come to give us some insights into the world of manners and etiquette.  Before we get started, a few housekeeping items:

1) To ensure you can hear the speaker, stand or sit on the

Calling! Salon (Unedited transcript)

Posted By on November 17, 2014

[2014/11/16 13:54]  Arthur Serpente (gauisartephiusserpente): oooooo coffee, hello Miss Psaltery, how are you?

[2014/11/16 13:54]  Garnet Psaltery: I’m very well, thank you, and you?

[2014/11/16 13:54]  Arthur Serpente (gauisartephiusserpente): /me attaches himself to the coffee machine with vigor

[2014/11/16 13:54]  Stereo Nacht: Good day Herr Baron, nice to see you back!

[2014/11/16 13:54]

Celebrating Dieselpunk Day

Posted By on November 12, 2014

On Dieselpunk Day, we set aside the constraints of normalcy to celebrate the dieselpunk community.

Created by greeting card manufacturers in the mid-1970s, Dieselpunk Day was a way to boost their pre-Christmas revenue. As we all know, people across the world needed something to celebrate after the terrible atomic dust storms earlier that year. Halloween had already passed, and Santa Inc. had not yet claimed a stranglehold on the last five months of the calendar.

So, while we know this is a corporate shill of a holiday, we should still recognize it as a way to bring a little light into our lives. Since the robot invasion of the late ’90s, the world has become a little smaller. We keep our individuality, but the teachings of the machines still influences us. We are colder. More predictable. More efficient with our feelings.

Let this be a day to say “thank you” for being alive. To put on your boots and goggles and stare at that bright part of the sky where the sun used to be. It’s what our grandparents would have done (if they weren’t eaten by mutants shortly after giving birth to our parents).

For the future,
-Tome

SteampunkNews is back on Twitter!

Posted By on November 11, 2014

After quite a gap, SteampunkNews is back on Twitter.  Apologies for the absence!

@SteampunkNewsUK

 

Cuisinart Top Interlock Repair

Posted By on November 2, 2014

Articles:

We got our first Cuisinart in 1982. It served us well for more than a decade so when it finally gave up the ghost we purchased another one. We were dismayed to find that the new Cuisinart Custom 14 had changed the interlock on the mixing bowl and top. There was now an additional tab so that the large plunger had to be in place and you were limited to the 2 inch diameter hole for feeding to process while the machine was running. It was annoying but we lived with it. But the plastic tab on this complicated interlock eventually broke. So we decided to design a 3-D printable replacement part that would return the operation to the way the old-style Cuisinart worked.

Broken Cuisinart interlock tab

I removed the broken interlock tab and drew a sketch of its dimensions. I sat down at the computer with Autodesk's 12 3-D Design and created a part that would fit where the old tab was but not engage with the plunger interlock pin.

The steampunk workshop

Once I completed the design of the part I exported it as an STL file.

Cuisinart replacement part in 1-2-3 design

However the part had some errors and was not interpreted correctly by Slic3r. So I loaded the part into Netfabb and re-exported it. That seemed to repair the errors.

Fixing the mesh in net fab for the Cuisinart part

I brought the part into Slic3r, which I set up for ABS plastic, 10% infill, three layers tops and sides, and 35% fan RPM for layers that would take less than 30 seconds to print. That last setting is necessary to get a clean fin on top of the block. I printed in ABS because sometimes these parts go through the dishwasher and I think ABS should be able to withstand those temperatures. PLA most likely would not.

Preparing the Cuisinart part for 3-D printing

The part took about 40 minutes to print, and it fit in place beautifully. I also printed out a plastic pin to retain it.

The 3-D printed Cuisinart interlock tab

 

Cuisinart Interlock Repair

Posted By on November 2, 2014

Articles:

We got our first Cuisinart in 1982. It served us well for more than a decade so when it finally gave up the ghost we purchased another one. We were dismayed to find that the new Cuisinart Custom 14 had changed the interlock on the mixing bowl and top. There was now an additional tab so that the large plunger had to be in place and you were limited to the 2 inch diameter hole for feeding to process while the machine was running. It was annoying but we lived with it. But the plastic tab on this complicated interlock eventually broke. So we decided to design a 3-D printable replacement part that would return the operation to the way the old-style Cuisinart worked.

Broken Cuisinart interlock tab

I removed the broken interlock tab and drew a sketch of its dimensions. I sat down at the computer with Autodesk's 12 3-D Design and created a part that would fit where the old tab was but not engage with the plunger interlock pin.

The steampunk workshop

Once I completed the design of the part I exported it as an STL file.

Cuisinart replacement part in 1-2-3 design

However the part had some errors and was not interpreted correctly by Slic3r. So I loaded the part into Netfabb and re-exported it. That seemed to repair the errors.

Fixing the mesh in net fab for the Cuisinart part

I brought the part into Slic3r, which I set up for ABS plastic, 10% infill, three layers tops and sides, and 35% fan RPM for layers that would take less than 30 seconds to print. That last setting is necessary to get a clean fin on top of the block. I printed in ABS because sometimes these parts go through the dishwasher and I think ABS should be able to withstand those temperatures. PLA most likely would not.

Preparing the Cuisinart part for 3-D printing

The part took about 40 minutes to print, and it fit in place beautifully. I also printed out a plastic pin to retain it.

The 3-D printed Cuisinart interlock tab

 

Pilgrim Pilsner’s Pure Puritanical Picks

Posted By on November 2, 2014

Hear ye, hear ye, all Pilgrims, turkeys, and soon to be disenfranchised Native Americans— the November Pilsner’s Picks have arrived, so give thanks and let the downloading begin!

http://pilsnerspicks.blogspot.com/

I’m still struggling with my new web host’s embed code formatting, and so two of the song titles seem to have been cut short on the screen for reasons that I can’t figure out yet. The full title of #2 is, “Cow Cow Davenport – Slum Gullion Stomp (1927),” and #9 is “Mae West – I Like A Guy What Takes His Time (1933).”

The Pilgrims had their problems, but at least they didn’t have to deal with the always confusing “alphabet soup” of HTML! Odds bodkins!

The fundraiser is almost over! One last chance to make your donation.

Posted By on October 30, 2014

The fundraiser for Dieselpunks will be over in two days. If you get any pleasure or entertainment from my website, please donate at least a dollar so I can keep it going. Otherwise, we’ll have to go through this all over again next year.

The fundraiser website is: http://kck.st/1pXzoZC

If you’ve already donated, you’ve done something grand. You’ve kept the retro-future alive!  For that, you have my most sincere thanks and gratitude.

For the future,
-Tome

Halloween Ghost stories: The Ghost Blimp

Posted By on October 28, 2014

Halloween is just around the corner, and I know you Dieselpunks are just dying for a good old fashion tale of mystery and the supernatural. This tale is one of the more well known stories from the World War 2 era, one that is still trying to be debunked. It involves a small voyage in a navy blimp, the L-8, during it’s last journey. It was a simple mission, but it ended with an extraordinary conclusion.

The L-8 was, like all US navy blimps, used to detect enemy submarines from above, as well as carry bombs to drop on any that were unfortunate enough to be found. The airfield on Treasure Island in San Francisco Bay was the main place to keep airships, and the L-8 moved there after the disaster of the Hindenburg in Lakehurst– the east-side’s main airship field. At 6:00am, the L-8 and its two crew members–Lieutenant Ernest Dewitt Cody and Ensign Charles Ellis Adams–set off for a routine patrol of the pacific coastline, despite being warned by their mechanic that the ship was too heavy, ignoring the warning and seeing the ship had no problem taking off.

At 7:50am, five miles east of the Farralone Island, the two man crew radioed in, reporting an oil slick. “Standby…” was the last sign of life from the airship. For an hour, the L-8 circled around the spot, witnessed by two ships in the area. Around 9:00am, the airship simply turned away from the reported oil slick and returned to San Francisco. Nobody was able to regain contact with the L-8, communication coming in but not coming out. Aircraft were even sent out to search for the L-8, fear that it had crashed into the ocean depths.

At 10:20am, the L-8 was spotted by a Pan Am flight. The spotters reported that the L-8 was heading towards the Golden Gate Bridge and was under control. Ten minutes later, ground witnesses saw the L-8 aim its nose up into the sky and rise above the clouds. That was the last sighting of the airship while it was in the air. At 10:50am, only 5 hours after its initial take-off, the L-8 was found by the beach.

Nightmare Blues – New from Aaron J. Shay

Posted By on October 27, 2014

Articles:
Friend of SPWS Aaron J. Shay has released a new music video for his banjo-rock barnstormer "Nightmare Blues" just in time for Halloween!

Described by one participant as what would happen "if Neil Gaiman art directed the ballroom sequence of Labyrinth at Burning Man," this video follows a band as they awaken in a strange place, performing for a surreal group of concertgoers, whose actions become less and less dreamlike and more sinister as the song continues.
 
Directed by Ben M. F. Rapson of Breathing Media.
Featuring Seattle's folk-punk street band The Mongrel Jews, and Bat Country's Bill Bullock!

Long horns are back!…..

Posted By on October 26, 2014

Can anyone think of a good steampunk use for these?  They’ve been cleaned up now and are glistening chrome.

Adding the iPad

Posted By on October 26, 2014

I have now included the iPad and controls (not shown) which are functioning very well.