Primavera tells the story of a stunning artistic adventure spanning over six of the most creative decades about French Art Décoratifs.

In 1912, the department store “Au Printemps” in Paris is the first of its kind to give itself an original art creation studio. The purpose of this art studio is to develop modern Arts Décoratifs and to facilitate their diffusion.

Conceived by René Guilleré, founder of the Société des Artistes Décorateurs and Pierre Laguionie, the young and dynamic manager of the department store ” Au Printemps “, the project is called Primavera (“Spring” in Italian) a name which cleverly echoes the department store’s own name, “Spring” in French.

As soon as WWI comes to its awaited end, Primavera rapidly grows up. The ideas behind this art creation studio are to have ensembles of hand-crafted furniture and art objects produced by traditional workshops, to promote young artists. Its purposes are to introduce art into interiors by making affordable to everyone useful or decorative objects, both beautiful, modern and of good quality.

Creators are appointed, a pottery is bought in Touraine-France to ensure part of the production, other art workshops’ collaboration is asked in various fields such as glass work and ceramics…Soon an original production is born.

The immediate success of Primavera prompts other parisian department stores to found their own art creation studio. Big names are recruited : Paul Follot creates Pomone for “Au Bon Marché“, while Maurice Duchêne takes the head of La Maîtrise for “Les Galeries Lafayette” and “Les Magasins du Louvre” hire Kohlmann for their Studium.

MRP Adventures: And the question is…

Posted By on November 9, 2010

What can postcolonial criticism do for literary steampunk?

I’ve been working on narrowing down exactly what I want to do for my MRP. Coming off’s Steampunk Fortnight and seeing these wonderful posts by Nisi, Amal, and Ay-Leen (and seeing them being cited in relevant places), and reading further commentary from Jeff Vandermeer (who, bless him, has been working really hard to showcase what I think really is the best of steampunk thus far), I really do think applying a postcolonialist approach to what’s currently out under the steampunk banner in the form of literary criticism is totally in order to tease out the difference between progressive, interrogative narratives that really reflect the anxieties and aspirations of our time and old-skool skiffy.
So, really, basically, what I’ve been doing on this blog, but I want to map out antecedents and theorists that people can hark to when approaching literary steampunk with a critical eye. And what the results might be. 
This of course means I really need to up the ante in my reading and gather a list of primary works that would serve this purpose. 
I have a wonderful book called Unthinking Eurocentrism which I bought for a class (“Feminist and Orientalism”) that we ended up not using, and it’s a fascinating read (thanks Dr. Heffernan!). I think I quote it extensively in my section of “Colonial Chic or Stylish Subversion?” that Ay-Leen and I co-authored for Shira Tarrant. There’s a great section called “From Eurocentrism to Polycentrism” (and after that it goes on to dissect cinema narratives) which really informs a lot of my thinking. I’m also reading up on more postcolonial theory (ya’d think I’d’ve learned more of it while in undergrad) with regards to literary criticism.
What I want to know is, would postcolonial theory find steampunk lacking? Would postcolonial theory rip it apart? In a bad way, even? I’m working from the assumption that it wouldn’t, that instead, postcolonial theory can tease out sites of resistance in steampunk from which it can grow as a subgenre, adding on layers to the aesthetic. But how would it do this? What’s in the steampunk postcolonialist’s toolbelt, so to speak?
Merf. My goggles, they need polishing. 


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